2610 Pioneer Avenue
Cheyenne, Wyoming 82001
(307) - 634 - 3052
info@mtsinaicheyenne.org
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Once a week we send out a newsletter that includes events coming up, news about the synagogue, a column from the Rabbi, and more. Sign up and keep in touch!

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Shabbat Services
Friday - 7:00 PM
Saturday - 10:30 AM
Shabbat Services are led either by Rabbi Larry Moldo or by lay leaders.

Photos Courtesy of Louis Davidson, Synagogues360.org

Coming Up

Thursday, September 27 -  11:30 AM to 1:30 PM - Library Open. Other times by request. Call Tim Solon, 632-4105 

Thursday, September 27 - 12 noon to 1 PM -  Torah Thursday. Take a few moments out of your week and join us at noon on Thursdays as we begin uncovering more about Abram and family with the help of commentators Rashi, Sforno and Steinsaltz. Feel free to bring a lunch. 

Thursday, September 27 - 6:30 PM - Shalom Dinner at Perkins Restaurant on Dell Range.

Friday, September 28  - 6 PM - Join us for our annual Sukkot dinner. 

Friday, September 28 - 7 PM - Shabbat services led by Rabbi Moldo followed by Oneg sponsored by the Sisterhood.

Saturday, September 29 -10:30 AM to 11:30 AM -  Shabbat services and Torah study led by Rabbi Moldo followed by Oneg sponsored by the Sisterhood.

Sunday, September 30  - 10 AM to 12 noon - Religious School.

Sunday, September 30 -  11:30 AM to 1:30 PM - Library Open. Other times by request. Call Tim Solon, 632-4105. 

Sunday, September 30  - 1:30 PM to 3 PM - Israeli & Jewish Dancing!!  This will the third class of the season and a great time to join us.  Contact Mary Weinstein (or any of the dancers) if you have any questions.  

Monday, October 1 - 11 AM -  Shmini Atzeret Yizkor Services.

Monday, October 1 - 6 PM - Simchat Torah Hakkafot.

Thursday, October 4 -  11:30 AM to 1:30 PM - Library Open. Other times by request. Call Tim Solon, 632-4105 

Thursday, October 4 - 12 noon to 1 PM -  Torah Thursday. Take a few moments out of your week and join us at noon on Thursdays as we begin uncovering more about Abram and family with the help of commentators Rashi, Sforno and Steinsaltz. Feel free to bring a lunch. 

Friday, October 5 - 7 PM - Shabbat services led by Rabbi Moldo followed by Oneg sponsored by the Sisterhood.

Saturday, October 6 -10:30 AM to 11:30 AM -  Shabbat services and Torah study led by Rabbi Moldo followed by Oneg sponsored by the Sisterhood.

Sunday, October 7  - 10 AM to 12 noon - Religious School.

Sunday, October 7 -  11:30 AM to 1:30 PM - Library Open. Other times by request. Call Tim Solon, 632-4105. 

Sunday, October 7  - 1:30 PM to 3 PM - Israeli & Jewish Dancing!!  This will the fourth class of the season and a great time to join us.  Contact Mary Weinstein (or any of the dancers) if you have any questions.  

Sunday, October 7 -  3 PM - Annual Hadassah Wine and Chocolate Event at Carol Fischer's house.  Please join us!   Men are welcome!
 
SAVE THE DATE!

Join us for a Family Havdalah Experience Saturday, October 27 from 6-7pm.  Let’s bid farewell to Shabbat and share in wishing one another a “Shavuah Tov”, a good week.  This is a beautiful and brief service to be enjoyed by all ages, young and old.  A Havdalah Kit project will be available following the service and of course, a yummy treat. Looking forward to seeing our Shul friends and meeting so many others. Get the word out to your family and friends and we’ll see you on October 27! 


High Holy Day Services Schedule

Monday 9/24 Sukkot Day 1
Tuesday 9/25 Sukkot Day 2 - Office closed
Friday 9/28 Sukkot Dinner 6 pm, services 7 pm
Saturday 9/29   Shabbat Hol HaMoed 10:30 am
Monday 10/1  Shmini Atzeret Yizkor 11 am
Simchat Torah Hakkafot 6 pm
Tuesday 10/2 Simchat Torah - Office closed

SEPTEMBER BIRTHDAYS

3              Cathy Berdan
5              Liz Wolf
9              Pewaubek Reid
10           Shira Michael
10           Craig Michael
13           Navit Reid
19           Rich Nolan

               


        

 



 

Weekly Message from our Board President

This is a week to be hungry.  Yes, last week was Yom Kippur, but we’re making up for it with two dinners!  On Thursday, we’ll all get together for our Shalom Dinner at Perkins Restaurant on Dell Range Blvd.  The reservations will be made for 6:30.  Then on Friday, we’ll have dinner in the Sukkah in the back yard of the Synagogue.  The dinner is at 6 PM, followed by services at 7.  If it gets too cold, we’ll move the dinner inside.  So that’s two opportunities to “break bread” together and enjoy each other’s company.  Nice!

This is a busy weekend at the Synagogue.  After Sukkot, we will celebrate Shmini Atzeret and Simchat Torah on Monday.  If you’re looking for the Rabbi, you know where he’ll be… at the Synagogue leading everything.

The Synagogue’s Board of Directors met last week, and made some decisions worth passing along.  First, the annual congregation meeting will be Sunday, December 9.  It starts with a brunch, followed by the formal meeting.  The Board and various committees will report on their activities over the past year, present the budget, and new Board members will be elected.  If you would like to serve on the Board of Directors, please contact the office.  We’ll send out an invitation by mail, along with absentee ballots, when we get a little closer.

The Kugel Cookoff is coming back!  This has been controversial in the past, with serious debates over apples vs. raisins, cheese vs. potato, and other chef-related issues.  The big winners are the people who come to judge the kugels, which is everybody.  The Kugel Cookoff will take place in January, so start planning those recipes now.

The Synagogue President gives a speech to the congregation every year at Yom Kippur.  We call it the State of the Synagogue, and the State of our Synagogue is very good.  Here’s an excerpt from the speech:

In the past year, we held Friday night Shabbat services 52 times.  We held Saturday morning Shabbat Services 52 times.  So to start, we held services 104 times.  In addition, we also held services for Sukkot, Simchas Torah, Shmini Atzeret, Hanukah, Purim, Passover, Shavuot, Tisha B’Av, Tu Bishvat,  and Yom Hashoah.  And I’m sure I missed some.  My point is that our focus on our religion is strong and we are following the traditions set by our forefathers.

But that’s only the beginning.  Mt. Sinai is also a social organization bringing together members of our community and sharing joyous, and sometimes sad, occasions together.  Just about every week, we gather for Torah Thursday to discuss the Talmud, and some members participate in Bibles and Beer with followers of other religions.  We enjoy movies together at our movie nights, and go out for dinner at our Shalom Dinners. 

We are a small congregation… somewhere between 40 and 50 families.  But our events and activities reach a far, far larger number.  People from Cheyenne and Wyoming come to the Synagogue for our events, and even our services.  We have something special here in Cheyenne, and the proof is the hundreds of people who come to our Yiddish Food Festival, Passover Seder, Hanukah Party, Torah Roll-out, Concerts, movies, See’s Candy Sale, and other activities.  We get a lot of support from the greater Cheyenne community, and it’s worth noting.

As I mentioned at the beginning, the state of our Synagogue is very good.  We’ve got a lot of work to do, but we are blessed with many volunteers eager to pitch in and help.  Maybe very good doesn’t cover that.  So I’ll conclude by saying the state of our Synagogue is excellent, and we’re excited about what the new year holds for us.

Here’s our Yiddish Phrase of the Week:

Ver es hot lib di melocheh iz im leicht di melocheh.
He who likes his work, to him work comes easy.

Shalom!

Dave Lerner
President
Mt. Sinai Board of Directors


Rabbi's Column

This is the Rabbi's Rosh Hashanah Sermon

Shanah Tovah!

Having one day of Rosh HaShanah presents us with Torah Reading options.

We can follow an American Reform practice of reading about the binding of Isaac (which is not what I chose to read this year). We can decide to read about the birth of Isaac, which is what many communities worldwide are reading, and what we read earlier. We could alternate between these two readings. Of course, just to flesh out all the possibilities, we could choose option number four – but I did not want anyone to think that I had not considered it at all.

A brief review of all the texts mentioned today is probably in order: We have Isaac being born, Hagar and Ishmael being kicked out of the household, and we have some local leaders verifying their desire for peaceful coexistence on the First Day of Rosh HaShanah.

Isaac goes with Abraham to a mountain where something will be sacrificed. Once we know that sacrificial object is a ram and not Isaac, then Abraham gets some gossipy news from the Old Country.

The selected prophetic portions joined to these Torah readings concern the birth of Samuel on one day and the rejoining of the Northern and Southern kingdoms of Israel on the other. You will notice that there is nothing mentioned concerning Rosh HaShanah in either the Torah Reading or prophetic selections. I will bring this point up again.

Part of today’s talk will review some suggested reasons these sections were picked in the first place. I will also mention some of the hot button issues these readings bring up. I will not go into details concerning the hot button issues, since if one of those is yours (as one of those is mine), then you really do not need any further attention paid to it.

My teacher, Rabbi Bernard Zlotowitz (not to be confused with his brother, also Rabbi Zlotowitz, who started ArtScroll) stated that using these particular sections was an attempt to one-up Christianity’s formative stories. We have an elderly Abraham and Sarah giving birth which definitely seems quite miraculous. We have Isaac. According to one tradition Isaac was indeed slain by Abraham and resurrected by the angels. Isaac then proceeded to get married and have children, which seems a bit different than some other resurrections.

A traditional conceit which connects the day with the reading is to imagine that the appointed time spoken of by the messengers who visited Abraham after his circumcision was Rosh HaShanah, and the connection between the ram used in place of Isaac and the shofar blown on Rosh HaShanah is fairly obvious.

From Tisha B’Av, which commemorates the destruction of the Temples, though Rosh HaShanah, there are assigned Haftarot of consolation which were not picked based on anything from the Torah reading itself, unlike the way things work during the rest of the year. So on Rosh HaShanah itself, the Torah portion that deals with childbirth connects with a prophetic section that also deals with childbirth; the Torah portion in which Abraham finds out a bit about what is happening with the folks back home connects with a prophetic section about reconnecting people.

Some of you might be either young enough or fortunate enough to not know how powerfully Torah texts can bring up other issues. In one of the retreats my seminary held, one session leader held a meditative session to help cantors and others focus on making the Torah environment real. Others with more meditative experience than I had had at that time kept their eyes open to stay grounded. I did not, and the leader evidently used meditation simply as a means to improve his singing, and had therefore seems never to have had an intense experience during meditation. He certainly did absolutely nothing about re-grounding after the experience. I had heard Ishmael crying, and identified quite strongly with the abandoned child. It took me a day or two to remember who I actually was.

The words of Torah are powerful.

Without thinking too much about it, within these two days of readings the following issues can be brought up for an individual: infertility, abandonment, abuse in general, (with several specific examples), distance from family, neighborhood disagreements (with neighborhood very loosely defined), God’s impossible requests, and there are probably a few others. Even if we are no longer in the place on the grief continuum that everything around us reminds us about our particular issue, thinking about what the text says can bring us back to a time when grief or powerlessness overwhelmed us. This effect is increased if the secular or Hebrew date is near an anniversary date. Anniversary dates, by the way, are moments when our bodies and psyches remind us that they remember when things happened in the past, even when we try to move on from that particular event.

There are issues that I try to avoid covering in depth, as I have my own triggers.

So, I look forward to hearing your thoughts about what we might do next year for the Torah Reading and Prophetic portion on Rosh Hashanah. In addition to your thoughts on that subject, I also continue to extend my invitation for original poetry relevant to the High Holidays, designed to be recited during part of the service.

More than 50 Years of Watkins Stained Glass Windows at Mt. Sinai Synagogue in Cheyenne, Wyoming.

Watkins Stained Glass Studio spent 50 years creating stained glass windows for the Synagogue. The 80 stained glass windows depict the Old Testament as well as the Menorah, Twelve Tribes of Israel, Moses at Mt. Sinai, the Tree of Life and 11 Women of the Hebrew Bible.
Four generations of Watkins men have devoted their lives to stained glass in Denver and the Rocky Mountain area since 1868. We hope you enjoy the 50 years of lovely Watkins Stained Glass Windows. The music is provided by John Waller, who graciously granted permission to use "Bless Us and Keep Us".

 

Additional Information

Check out all the Learning Opportunities at Mt. Sinai!

Check out the photos of our events

Mt. Sinai Religious School

Welcome to Mt. Sinai Religious School. [Click here for the 2018-2019 calendar] This year, under the direction of Rabbi Larry and the Education Committee, there are three component pieces. The first component piece is most like the traditional Sunday School in that it meets on Sundays from 10 to noon, and is geared towards students in Kindergarten through 5th grade. The content covered will depend upon each student’s prior knowledge. The second component piece is Bar/Bat Mitzvah training. This involves weekly sessions with Rabbi Larry and attendance at both Friday night and Saturday morning services. The third component will be for post Bar/Bat Mitzvah age youth, and will be partly designed by the students.

Religious School will start up again on Sunday, September 16 from 10 to noon. We operate in a one-room schoolhouse format - everyone who attends is in the same classroom, taught by the Rabbi. Membership in the congregation is not a requirement of attending classes, and there is no tuition fee involved. If you anticipate that children you are responsible for on Sunday mornings will be attending, please let Rabbi Moldo know sometime soon.

We also offer Adult Education classes on a variety of topics throughout the year. Please click here.

If you would like further information, please contact Phyllis Bloomberg or Rabbi Larry. 

 

Mt. Sinai Movie Nights

All movies are shown at Mt. Sinai on the “big screen” and with surround sound. Refreshments and drinks provided. Come join us for any or all of our upcoming movies.


Community Partner with Family Promise of Cheyenne