2610 Pioneer Avenue
Cheyenne, Wyoming 82001
(307) - 634 - 3052
info@mtsinaicheyenne.org
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Shabbat Services
Friday - 7:00 PM
Saturday - 10:30 AM
Shabbat Services are led either by Rabbi Larry Moldo or by lay leaders.

Photos Courtesy of Louis Davidson, Synagogues360.org

Click here to buy tickets for the Sally and George Concert at the Synagogue,
Sunday, June 17, starting at 7 PM. Click here to see our poster about the concert.

 

Coming Up

  
Wednesday, June 13
- Meeting with Susan Gutterman, the Endowment Director of the Jewish Foundation of Greensboro, North Carolina to discuss the Mt. Sinai Endowment Fund. Meeting is dinner at 5:15 at Twin Dragon Restaurant, followed by a meeting for the Congregation at 6:30 in the Synagogue.

Thursday, June 14 -  11:30 AM to 1:30 PM - Library Open. Other times by request. Call Tim Solon, 632-4105 

Thursday, June 14 - 12 noon to 1 PM - Torah Thursday. Take a few moments out of your week and join us at noon on Thursdays as we begin uncovering more about Abram and family with the help of commentators Rashi, Sforno and Steinsaltz. Feel free to bring a lunch. 

Friday, June 15 - 7 PM - Shabbat services led by Rabbi Moldo followed by Oneg sponsored by the Sisterhood.    

Saturday, June 16 -10:30 AM to 11:30 AM -  Shabbat services and Torah study led by Rabbi Moldo followed by Oneg sponsored by the Sisterhood.  

Sunday, June 17 - 11:30 AM to 1:30 PM - Library Open. Other times by request. Call Tim Solon, 632-4105 

Sunday, June 17 - 7 PM (doors open at 6 PM) - Sally & George Concert!!  This concert will start out in the acoustically unique location of the Mt. Sinai main sanctuary. After intermission, the concert will resume in the social hall with Sally & George singing their more familiar favorites.

It's like getting two concerts for the price of one admission.

Advance Purchased Tickets are $15 each. 
Tickets at the door will be $20 each. 

Open Seating. Snacks and beverages will be available for purchase starting at intermission. 

There will be two 45-minute sets with a 15-minute intermission in between the sets.

Wednesday, June 20 - 6:30 PM - Board Meeting.

Thursday, June 21 -  11:30 AM to 1:30 PM - Library Open. Other times by request. Call Tim Solon, 632-4105 

Thursday, June 21 - 12 noon to 1 PM - Torah Thursday. Take a few moments out of your week and join us at noon on Thursdays as we begin uncovering more about Abram and family with the help of commentators Rashi, Sforno and Steinsaltz. Feel free to bring a lunch. 

Friday, June 22 - 7 PM - Shabbat services followed by Oneg sponsored by the Sisterhood.    

Saturday, June 23 -10:30 AM to 11:30 AM -  Shabbat services and Torah study followed by Oneg sponsored by the Sisterhood.  

Sunday, June 24 - 11:30 AM to 1:30 PM - Library Open. Other times by request. Call Tim Solon, 632-4105 


JUNE BIRTHDAYS

26           Dennis Coelho
28           Harriett Gardner
29           Marv Wolf
30           Carol Serelson    

               


        

 



 

Weekly Message from our Board President

It’s something new!  Mt. Sinai has two long term fundraising groups.  One is the Mt. Sinai Trust, which got its start when the Synagogue sold some land it owned back in the 1970’s.  The other is the Mt. Sinai Endowment Fund.  The Endowment Fund started with the sponsorship of the Women of the Torah stained glass windows.  The two groups have different approaches, but the same goal.  They want to grow large enough so the Synagogue can use the interest for its operations.

The Trust already contributes a portion of the Rabbi’s salary.  The Endowment is still working on growing so it can contribute interest as well.  One of the ways the Endowment is raising money is by holding a concert this weekend.

The concert features Sally and George, a new group made up of Shelby Means and her husband Joel Timmons.  Shelby grew up in Laramie and her Mom is on the Mt. Sinai Board of Directors.  For the past few weeks, we’ve been featuring music videos made by Sally and George.  We’ve saved their big one for today.  It’s the title track of their new album – Tip My Heart.


The concert is this Sunday night at 7 at the Synagogue.  The doors open at 6.  The first part of the concert will take place in the large sanctuary and be more of an acoustic set.  After that the audience will move to the Social Hall for the second set.  Beer, soft drinks, and snacks will be available for purchase.  Tickets are $15 in advance and $20 at the door.  Tickets are available on the home page of our website – www.MtSinaiCheyenne.org.

A few weeks ago, we had scheduled a meeting with Susan Gutterman, the Endowment Director of the Jewish Foundation of Greensboro, North Carolina. The meeting had to be re-scheduled, and is now set for this Wednesday, June 13. We'll start with an early dinner at 5:15 at Twin Dragon Restaurant, and then Ms. Gutterman will answer questions and make a presentation about Endowment Funds (like ours) at 6:30 at the Synagogue. Everyone is welcome to either or both events.

Coming up next – the Israeli Scouts are returning to Cheyenne.  The Synagogue is holding its annual summer picnic on Sunday, July 1st, and the Scouts will perform as part of the event.  The Scouts have been here before and always put on a great show.  They are a group of Israeli young people who sing and dance and act as goodwill ambassadors for Israel.  It’s an exciting and upbeat show.

Here’s a fun one from Babs Klein:
“When it’s really cold in the big sanctuary, I know exactly what to do.”
“What?”
“Shiver.”

Here’s our Yiddish Phrase of the Week:

Ain mol iz geven a chochmeh.
A trick is clever only once
.

Shalom!

Dave Lerner
President
Mt. Sinai Board of Directors


Rabbi's Column

I spent this past Shabbat at a different shul elsewhere. During one of the Divrei Torah (plural of D'var Torah = Torah talk) a particular story concerning Eliezer and Rivkah was mentioned. The point of the story in the context of the talk was that sometimes putting things off until the time seems right makes the action less a symbol of the emotional connectedness between human beings. However, there are other implications of the story, some of which are less kind to others.

The Torah text has Abraham give Eliezer the task of finding a wife for Isaac back in the old country where Abraham's family still lives. Eliezer arrives at the local well, designs a test for Isaac's potential wife, and immediately Rivkah arrives and passes the test by watering the 10 camels as well as Eliezer. This seems a quite reasonable test of a young woman's concern for others and upper body strength, both of which would be quite useful for Isaac's wife.

In the Rabbinic Midrash quoted at the D'var Torah, Rivkah is 3 years old when this happens. What Eliezer notices first is that the well waters rise to meet the girl, so that she doesn't have to lower the bucket to the water, she only has to bring the bucket to where the animals or people can drink from it. (which is probably hard enough, especially if you are 3 years old) and the water's actions were like neon signs for Eliezer, showing him that this was the right girl.

I am not going to discuss the modern implications of this story - I am sure all of you can think of plenty of ways that this Midrash colors everything else that happens for a couple of generations. My question is what are the implications of a betrothal story where the girl is three years old, and why tell this in this fashion here?

Putting this story in the best light: one issue that was quite important for several parents during the Roman Occupation was making sure that their daughters would be cared for if something happened to them. One way of doing this was to connect a daughter to another household through a betrothal. Jewish law allows for these betrothals to take place when the girl is as young as 3 years old. (Jewish law also allows the girl to void the betrothal when she comes of age - no legal contract is ever binding unless the party themselves agrees to it). Telling a story where one of the Matriarchs is 3 years old when she is betrothed could make this process more palatable.

A more worrisome implication of this story (which is what I had in mind in bringing it up in the first place): the Torah text has Eliezer doing something that makes sense and is quite laudable. He comes up with an idea of how to figure out who is the best match, and it has nothing to do with looks or simple strength. It could be that some of the Rabbis had a problem with somebody who was part of Abraham's household but not biologically related to him acting for the benefit of Isaac without explicit Divine intervention. As if somebody who works for us must have a hidden agenda that you have to control for, and can't actually be a person of integrity.

We often know why we tell particular stories about ourselves and others. What we remember and mention reinforces our particular view of reality and humanity. When we are certain others are not to be trusted, we remember and relate the times when people took advantage of our good nature. When we are certain people are worthy of trust, we remember and relate those stories where people justified our opinion of them. One example which verifies our outlook is usually enough to entrench that outlook. Other example in our lives are usually considered mere exceptions, when they are remembered at all.

Unintended implications of the stories we tell ourselves exist. "I didn't mean it that way!" may be true, but does not remove the implication. Changing the way we tell the story sometimes can. At other times, the only thing we can do is continue to communicate with each other, and realize that is the story we tell can have hidden implications, the meanings we find in the stories others tell might not have been meant by them at all.

Multiple meanings of statements and events abound in every generation, and between generations. I am sure everyone can think of some recent events, decisions and statements to which the reactions have been varied.

On the other hand, when somebody clearly and simply threatens you, do not worry about finding a non-threatening implication of their statement. Take care of yourself. Likewise, when somebody says something positive or non-threatening to you, do not search out an implied threat - we do notice what we look for, so try to notice the good and protect yourselves from evil.

More than 50 Years of Watkins Stained Glass Windows at Mt. Sinai Synagogue in Cheyenne, Wyoming.

Watkins Stained Glass Studio spent 50 years creating stained glass windows for the Synagogue. The 80 stained glass windows depict the Old Testament as well as the Menorah, Twelve Tribes of Israel, Moses at Mt. Sinai, the Tree of Life and 11 Women of the Hebrew Bible.
Four generations of Watkins men have devoted their lives to stained glass in Denver and the Rocky Mountain area since 1868. We hope you enjoy the 50 years of lovely Watkins Stained Glass Windows. The music is provided by John Waller, who graciously granted permission to use "Bless Us and Keep Us".

 

Additional Information

Check out all the Learning Opportunities at Mt. Sinai!

Check out the photos of our events

Mt. Sinai Religious School

Welcome to Mt. Sinai Religious School.  [Click here for this year’s calendar] [Click here for the 2018-2019 calendar] This year, under the direction of Rabbi Larry and the Education Committee, there are three component pieces. The first component piece is most like the traditional Sunday School in that it meets on Sundays from 10 to noon, and is geared towards students in Kindergarten through 5th grade. The content covered will depend upon each student’s prior knowledge. The second component piece is Bar/Bat Mitzvah training. This involves weekly sessions with Rabbi Larry and attendance at both Friday night and Saturday morning services. The third component will be for post Bar/Bat Mitzvah age youth, and will be partly designed by the students.

We also offer Adult Education classes on a variety of topics throughout the year. Please click here.

If you would like further information, please contact Phyllis Bloomberg or Rabbi Larry. 

 

Mt. Sinai Movie Nights

All movies are shown at Mt. Sinai on the “big screen” and with surround sound. Refreshments and drinks provided. Come join us for any or all of our upcoming movies.


Community Partner with Family Promise of Cheyenne